Publication Details

Valencia:2013
Field Value
Title: The age and composition of the pre‐Cenozoic basement of the Jalisco Block: implications for and relation to the Guerrero composite terrane
Authors: V. A. Valencia, K. Righter, J. Rosas‐Elguera, M. Lopez‐Martinez, and M. Grove
Publication: Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology , v. 166, p. 801‐824.
Publish Date: August 2013
DOI: 10.1007/s00410-013-0908-z
PDF: pdf
BibTEX Citation: Valencia:2013.bib

Abstract:

The Jalisco Block is thought to be part of the Guerrero terrane, but the nature and age of the underlying crystalline basement are largely unknown. We have collected a suite of schists, granitoids, and weakly metamorphosed marine sediments from various parts of the Jalisco Block including Atenguillo and Ameca, Mascota and San Sebastia’n, Cuale, Puerto Vallarta, Punta Mita, Yelapa, and Tomatla’n. The schists range in age from 135 to 161 Ma, with many exhibiting Proterozoic and Phanerozoic zircon ages. The granitoids range in age from 65 to 90 Ma, and are calc alkaline compositionally similar to granitoids from the Puerto Vallarta and Los Cabos batholiths. The Jalisco granitoids also experienced similar uplift rates to granitoids from the regions to the north and south of the Jalisco Block. The marine sediments yield a maximum depositional age of 131 Ma, and also contain a significant zircon population with ages extending back to the Archean. Granitoids from this study define two age groups, even after the effects of thermal resetting and different closure temperatures are considered. The 66.8‐Ma silicic ash flow tuff near Union de Tula significantly expands the extent of this Cretaceous‐Paleocene age ash flow tuff unit within the Jalisco Block, and we propose calling the unit ”Carmichael silicic ash flow tuff volcanic succession” in honor of Ian Carmichael. The ages of the basement schists in the Jalisco Block fully overlap with the ages of terranes of continental Mexico, and other parts of the Guerrero terrane in the south, confirming the autochthonous origin of the Jalisco Block rather than exotic arc or allochthonous origin. Geologic data, in combination with geochronologic and oxygen isotopic data, suggest the evolution of SW Mexico with an early 200‐1,200‐Ma passive margin, followed by steep subduction in a continental arc setting at 160‐165 Ma, then shallower subduction by 135 Ma, and finally, emplacement of granitoids at 65‐90 Ma.